7 November 2007

1st IDIA Conference

Before | After


After the Conference

Participants came from 18 countries: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mozambique, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, South Africa, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America


Before the Conference

Themes | Language | Call for Papers

The 1st Conference of the International Development Informatics Association (IDIA) in conjunction with the Centre for Community Networking Research (CCNR), Monash University will be held in Prato (Italy) on 7 November 2007.

The implementation of ICT in developing economies has constraints not applicable in developed regions. Constraints cover a wide range: from technologies and infrastructures (energy grids, networks) to human aspects such as poverty and low or no literacy. The Conference aims to create a platform for exchanging experiences, case studies, and possible solutions to address the difficulties in deploying ICT in developing contexts.

Themes

Development Informatics is a branch of Informatics, with the focus on developing environments. Any Informatics theme would thus be relevant, but of course with the focus on its contrained environment - for example, how can e-governance be deployed in a low or no literate society?

Suggested themes include, but are not limited to:

Note that contributions must be relevant to Development Informatics.

Language

Conference contributions must be delivered in English.

Call for Papers

We are seeking abstracts and proposals from academics, practitioners and PhD students for a conference and workshop event at the Monash University Centre, Prato Italy. The Centre for Community Networking Research, Monash, in conjunction with the Community Informatics Research Network (www.ciresearch.net), has held highly successful events in 2003, 2004, and 2006 in Prato. This conference is also being held in conjunction with the inaugural conference of the International Development Informatics Association (IDIA).

The Prato campus is an exceptional environment in which to exchange ideas with colleagues. The Centre is just off the main piazza of a small Tuscan city. It is close to Italian transport hubs.


The Internet has become a powerful community resource in many parts of the world. It is widely viewed as a device with capacity for
incorporation into different forms of community action, including social change, community learning, community connection, community knowledge, and community well-being and community development. The concept of 'community' itself is itself interpreted in a multitude of ways, and the problem of definition of this (and other terms such as 'empowerment') was highlighted at the 2006 Prato conference. The 90 or so questions which were emphasised during the final plenary represent a range of the eternal cycle of questions of community action and engagement. Whatever technology may be used to work with a community, the issues remain.

At the forthcoming event, we will accept that the concepts of action and community are variable, and that the forms of action which have emerged over the past decade should be judged in terms of what they achieve for community and social good. Through learning about multiple forms of action and how action is understood, we should improve our grasp of the complexities of social-technical relations.

The Conference will feature a special stream led by the International
Development Informatics Association of South Africa as part of its first conference, devoted to studying these, and related questions in
relationship to development informatics.

The implementation of ICT in developing economies involves constraints not applicable in developed regions. Constraints cover a wide range from technologies and infrastructures (energy grids, networks) to human aspects such as poverty and illiteracy. The Conference aims to create a platform for exchanging experience and possible solutions to address
such problems.